Business – Am I required to support EMV?

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No, you are not required to support EMV in the U.S. region at this time. However, one item that you need to consider is that even if your organization hasn’t been targeted by high levels of card present fraud in the past, you may be putting yourself at risk in…

Business – How does EMV chip technology work?

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Your EMV-enabled device will communicate with the chip inside the customer’s smart card to determine whether or not the card is authentic. Generally, the terminal will prompt the customer to sign or enter a PIN to validate their identity. This process enhances the authentication of both the card and cardholder,…

Business – How is a chip card different from a traditional payment card?

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A chip payment card looks just like a traditional card with an embedded chip in addition to the standard magnetic stripe on the back of the card. What you see on the card is not the actual microchip but a protective overlay. The microchip provides an additional level of authenticity…

Personal – How am I impacted by the liability shift?

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With the liability shift, if a chip card is presented to a merchant that has not adopted a terminal that is certified for chip card acceptance, liability for counterfeit fraud may shift to the merchant’s acquirer – who may then pass this fee back to the merchant. The liability shift…

Personal – Why should I invest in chip card acceptance now?

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Preventing the growth of fraudulent activity is one of the main reasons the industry is moving toward EMV technology. Chip cards make it difficult for fraud organizations to target cardholders and businesses alike. As a result, more and more chip cards are being introduced by U.S. financial institutions in order…

Personal – Is this technology unique to the United States?

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No. The chip technology standard for payment was first used in France in 1992. Today, there are more than 1 billion chip cards used around the world. The U.S. is one of the few industrialized nations that have not fully transitioned to this technology standard.